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Iran has arrested 20 people including some foreigners near the border with Iraq and accused them of belonging to a spy network, the state-run news agency reported Monday. The IRNA news agency did not provide the nationalities of the foreigners. Iran last month claimed to have uncovered spy rings organized by the United States and its Western allies. IRNA, quoting the head of the intelligence department in the Kerman Shah province, said the 20 were trained by intelligence services “of the enemy” for economic, military, political, cultural and social purposes. It did not elaborate.

Iranian authorities have charged four Iranian-Americans with endangering national security. Haleh Esfandiari, director of the Middle East program at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, was jailed in early May. The other four are Kian Tajbakhsh, an urban planning consultant with George Soros’ Open Society Institute; Parnaz Azima, a journalist for the U.S.-funded Radio Farda; and Ali Shakeri, a founding board member of the University of California, Irvine, Center for Citizen Peacebuilding.

Iran arrests 20 people accused of being spies – USATODAY.com

And more:

Iranian police and plainclothes security agents broke up a sit-in marking Monday’s anniversary of a bloody raid on a Tehran university dormitory, then stormed the offices of the country’s main pro-democracy student group, student leaders said.

Fifteen students and a mother were beaten and detained, they said. There was no confirmation by the government, which rarely comments on such arrests.

Iran had banned street protests to mark the anniversary of July 9, 1999 raid by police and hard-line vigilantes on a Tehran University dormitory that killed one person and injured at least 20.

Those attacks triggered six days of nationwide protests, the worst since the 1979 Islamic revolution that toppled the pro-U.S. Shah Mohammad Reza Pahlavi and brought hard-line clerics to power.

Pouya Ifaei, a student leader, said the students organized their sit-in at Amir Kabir University Monday to protest the continued detention of eight students been in custody since May on vague charges and to mark the anniversary of the 1999 attack.

Six students were attacked, beaten up and then detained by police and plainclothes security agents as they staged a sit-in at the main entrance to Amir Kabir University,” Nariman Mostafavi, another student leader, told The Associated Press.

But there are more bad news from Teheran. My friend Aquiles had sent me a tip (in Spanish) but I have managed to found nearly everything in English. You can read it in the following posts:

Stoning was carried in Iran:

Jafar Kiani, the man who was sentenced to stoning, along with his partner, Makroumeh Ebrahimi, was stoned. The stoning was arranged for two weeks ago, causing huge disgust in the blogosphere which helped aware the public, something which only paused the verdict, he was stoned on Thursday. There is still no news about Makroumeh, who is still held in prison in Qazvin. One of her lawyers has stated his worries about her, “They are going to carry the verdict on her, too”. The couple have married together thirteen years ago, and have an eleven-year-old child. The judge has not accepted their marriage and has called it adultery. The news is both approved by activists (also, also, also) and by the news sources close to the reformists. Reportedly, the public hesitated from attending the stoning and thus the Police stoned the man. The stoning carried out in Aghche-kand village, in Takistan, Qazvin Province. The Judiciary is still not commenting on the news, but local sources have undoubtedly verified it (source: Roozna).

Jafar Kiani was killed yesterday.Kamangir also reports that a blogger has visited the place where the stoning took place: his blood can still be seen.

The woman’s sentence is still pending.

Just read everything in the links posted before.Another 20 members of different gangs will be also executed on charges of rape, acting against God’s rule, and homosexuality. Asked if the execution will be in public, Jamshidi, the Judiciary’s spokesman, said “that depends on the Judiciary’s decision”. “There are other cases in other cities as well”, he added.

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The UK government has defended itself against claims by Interpol’s head that it is failing to check visitors against a database of stolen passports. Ronald K Noble, the police agency’s chief, said there was a “clear link between stolen passports and al-Qaeda linked terrorist activity”.

Mr Noble told the BBC’s Today it was “extraordinary” the UK was not making use of the information at its disposal. The Home Office has insisted border officials were aware of the list.

It said any name on the list which was also regarded as a threat by police forces or the Serious and Organised Crime Agency (Soca) would be passed to border authorities.

Mr Noble said in an open letter that only 17 out of Interpol’s 186 member countries systematically checked the passport numbers of incoming travellers against the database. “On the other hand, all countries systematically check our bags to see if we are carrying bottles of water or other liquids,” he said. “These priorities seem misplaced.” He also warned that a British “watch list” had not been passed to Interpol.

BBC NEWS | UK | UK defends its border procedures

More about Australia connection:

Police in Australia have carried out further searches in connection with the suspected car bomb attempts in London and at Glasgow Airport.

Officers have searched the home of Mohammed Haneef, 27, who was arrested as he tried to leave Brisbane international airport late last Monday.

The Indian doctor is related to two of the six people being held in the UK.

Another man, Bilal Abdullah, 27, was remanded in custody on Saturday charged with conspiracy to cause explosions.

The Iraqi doctor is the only person charged over the suspected attack attempts. The charge carries a maximum life sentence.

Over the weekend, anti-terror police were also granted more time to question five of the six other people detained in the UK.

The sixth person, Kafeel Ahmed, is in a Glasgow hospital suffering from severe burns.

According to his lawyer in Brisbane, Dr Haneef has not been interviewed since a magistrate granted police 72 hours of so-called dead time – which allows them to review the evidence and pursue other lines of inquiry – three days ago.

Police will then have 12 hours of interviewing time left available to them, although they could seek a further extension.

However, they have returned to Dr Haneef’s top-floor apartment, close to the hospital where he worked on Queensland’s Gold Coast, to carry out further searches and have towed away his car, a blue Honda Jazz.

Thanks to Stefania, I reach a Daily Mail article: Eight Al Qaeda fanatics working for the police (but they don’t dare sack them):

The dossier was drawn up with the help of MI5 amid fears that individuals linked to Islamic extremism are taking advantage of police attempts to increase the proportion of ethnic staff.

Astonishingly, many of the alleged jihadists have not been sacked because – it is claimed – police do not have the “legal power” to dismiss them. smile_cry

We can also reveal that one suspected jihadist officer working in the South East has been allowed to keep his job despite being caught circulating Internet images of beheadings and roadside bombings in Iraq.

He is said to have argued that he was trying to “enhance” debate about the war.

Classified intelligence reports raising concerns about police staff’s background cannot be used to justify their dismissal, sources said. smile_whatchutalkingabout

Australia has extended the terror inquiry on Haneef.

Also in UK:

Three men accused of taking part in an extremist Muslim plot to carry out a series of suicide bombings on London’s transport system in July 2005 have been convicted of conspiracy to murder.

art.montage.giPolice issued these closed circuit television images of the suspects soon after the events of July 21, 2005 on London trains and buses.

Muktar Said Ibrahim, 29; Yassin Omar, 26; and Ramzi Mohammed, 25, were found guilty Monday of plotting to bomb London’s public transport system on July 21, 2005. Later, Hussain Osman, 28, was also found guilty of conspiracy to murder for taking part in the plot.

The jury, still deliberating on two co-defendents, was sent home for the night after failing to reach verdicts on Manfo Kwaku Asiedu, 33, and Adel Yahya, 24.

Earlier, Judge Adrian Fulford told the jury of nine women and three men he would accept 10-2 majority verdicts on the remaining three defendants, The Associated Press reported.

[…] The July 21 failed attacks happened 14 days after the July 7 London suicide attacks, which killed 52 commuters and four bombers.

The defendants — all from London — denied charges of conspiracy to murder and conspiracy to cause explosions.

Four of the men claimed the devices, made from liquid hydrogen peroxide, chapati flour, acetone and acid, were a hoax. Another claimed they were real bombs but that he was duped while the sixth man denies having anything to do with the alleged conspiracy.

During the trial the jury was told by prosecutor Nigel Sweeney that the conspiracy “had been in existence long before the events of July 7” and did not appear to be some “hastily arranged copycat.”

Each bomb was placed in a large plastic container in a knapsack and screws, tacks, washers or nuts, were taped to the outside to “maximize the possibility of injury,” Sweeney said.

Angel has more about Islam in UK.

Other news include:

(more…)

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Hmm, and this is the country who has been erased from the black list of UN Human Rights Council, while Israel was maintained.

Minsk, Jul. 5, 2007 (CWNews.com) – Police in Belarus have arrested 20 Christian human-rights workers in two separate incidents this week, reports Christian Solidarity Worldwide.

On July 2, 14 activists were arrested as they collected signature on petitions calling for restoration of a Catholic church to active use. St. Joseph’s church in Budslaw has been closed by authorities, and parishioners fear that it may be converted into a hotel. They were circulating a petition opposing that change, as well as a separate petition calling for changes in the country’s laws governing religion. The 14 activists were released after several hours, but their petitions were confiscated.

The next day, July 3, police raided an apartment in Minsk and arrested 6 activists who were preparing literature calling for changes in the 2002 religion law. They too were released after spending most of a day in prison, but their campaign material– including computers and printers as well as religious literature– was seized. Alaksiej Shein, the co-chairman of the Belarus Christian Democrat Party, told Christian Solidarity Worldwide that the raid in Minsk was illegal, since police had no warrant. He said that the raid and the arrests were clearly intended to intimidate religious activists.

Catholic World News : Belarus: 20 Church workers arrested in crackdown

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Plateau writes about the new film Oliver Stone is going to make: about Ahmadinejad (no, you have not read wrongly):

Oscar-winner Oliver Stone has sent aletter to the Iranian president’s office requesting permission to makea docudrama on President Mahmud Ahmadinejad, stated an Iranian producerwho is regularly consulted by the president’s art and culturaladvisors.

The request was made three months ago byStone, the famous U.S. filmmaker, who has directed numerous films with socio-political themes over the past few years,” Alireza Sajjadpur toldthe Persian service of the Iranian Students’ News Agency on Friday.

I think it is a good proposal and I would like the request to be accepted,” he added.

I bet he is not going to consider the treatment of women,

stones2.jpg

of gays

or of minors (also here) for the movie…

Oh and I bet he is not going also to consider the treatment to the Amir Kabir students.

There are good reasons to believe that the students have received repeated physical and psychological tortures in order to confess tofalse confessions about the allegations attached to them by statenewspapers.

I just can’t stand this millionaires who had no consideration of the real world. What a difference with this other film. Really impressive. Plateau describes Iranian film Persepolis:

Persepolis is the poignant story of a young girl coming-of-age in Iran during the Islamic Revolution. It is through the eyes of precocious and outspoken nine-year-old Marjane that we see a people’s hopes dashed as fundamentalists take power — forcing the veil on women and imprisoning thousands. Clever and fearless, she outsmarts the “social guardians” and discovers punk, ABBA and Iron Maiden. Yet when her uncle is senselessly executed and as bombs fall around Tehran in the Iran/Iraq war the daily fear that permeates life in Iran is palpable.

I will search for it in Spain.

Sent to Open Trackbacks to 123 beta, Pirate’s Cove, Right Truth, Demediacratic Nation, A Blog for All, Blue Star Chronicles, Blog@MoreWhat.com, Women Honour Thyself.

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Go over to Gateway Pundit, Dinah Lord, and Sugiero for information.

imageIranian bloggers Kamangir, Iranian Plateau (from whose blog I have taken the ohoto of the left), City Boy, Noggr and Serendip have also looked into this.

More links:

Brisbane Times

estación de servicio iraní quemadaIran’s gas rationing sets off violence

Houston Chronicle – 51 minutes ago
By NASSER KARIMI AP Writer © 2007 AP TEHRAN, Iran – Iranians smashed shop windows and set fire to a dozen gas stations in the capital Wednesday, angered by the sudden start of a fuel rationing system that threatens to further increase the unpopularity of President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad.

Police were sent to guard some stations after the violence, and there was calm during the day as motorists lined up to fill their tanks under the new restrictions.

The government had been warning for weeks that rationing was coming, but the announcement of its start just three hours before the plan took effect at midnight Tuesday startled people and sent them rushing to get one last fill-up.image

The rationing is part of a government attempt to reduce the $10 billion it spends each year to import fuel that is then sold to Iranian drivers at less than cost, to keep prices low.

Iran is one of the world’s biggest oil producers, but it doesn’t have enough refineries, so it must import more than 50 percent of the gasoline its people use. The government says money saved from subsidies can go to building refineries, improving public transit and creating jobs.

But a hike in gas prices last month and now the rationing are feeding discontent with Ahmadinejad, who was elected in 2005 on a platform of helping the poor and fixing Iran’s ailing economy. His failure to do so has sparked widespread criticism.

This man, Ahmadinejad, has damaged all things. The timing of the rationing is just one case,” said Reza Khorrami, a 27-year-old teacher who was among those lined up at one Tehran gas station late Tuesday.image

Petrol stations torched in Iran after Ahmadinejad rations fuel Times Online
Iran fuel rations spark anger, pump stations burn Reuters AlertNet
Spiegel Online – Los Angeles Times – Telegraph.co.uk – Guardian Unlimited
all 369 news articles »

This ain’t Hell, but you can see it from here writes about the nuclear problem.

Also take a look at A second Hand Conjecture, specially about the unrest against the Mullahs.

Other news from Iran:

  1. Take a look at “Couple tortured for being gay” and “Interview with Fakhravar“, one of the most prominent Iranian dissidents, from City Boy Blog.
  2. Ahmadinejad’s political consultant is his butcher. Doesn’t surprise me really…smile_omg
  3. Iran: End child executions” and “Iranian troops cross into Southern Iraq and attack British troops“. Also “Iran wages war on “inmoral” cell phone messages.
  4. Also read Iran cracks down on dissent by NYT. h/t Free and Secular Iran.

The country’s police chief boasted that 150,000 people — a number far larger than usual — were detained in the annual spring sweep against any clothing considered not Islamic. More than 30 women’s rights advocates were arrested in one day in March, according to Human Rights Watch, five of whom have since been sentenced to prison terms of up to four years. They were charged with endangering national security for organizing an Internet campaign to collect more than a million signatures supporting the removal of all laws that discriminate against women.

Eight student leaders at Tehran’s Amir Kabir University, the site of one of the few public protests against Mr. Ahmadinejad, disappeared into Evin Prison starting in early May. Student newspapers had published articles suggesting that no humans were infallible, including the Prophet Muhammad and Iran’s supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei.

The National Security Council sent a stern three-page warning to all the country’s newspaper editors detailing banned topics, including the rise in gasoline prices or other economic woes like possible new international sanctions, negotiations with the United States over the future of Iraq, civil society movements and the Iranian-American arrests.

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Christian Science Monitor has run two very important reports on China and its relationship with Sudan, something I had written about in the past:

In Sudan, China focuses on oil wells, not local needs.

Sudan’s oil production averages 536,000 barrels a day, according to estimates by the Paris-based International Energy Agency. Other estimates say it is closer to 750,000 barrels a day. And there is an estimated 5 billion-barrel reservoir of oil beneath Sudan’s 1 million-square-mile surface, almost all of it in the south of the country, an area inhabited mainly by Christian and animist black Africans who fought a 21-year civil war against the Arab-dominated Muslim government of the north.

The vast majority of this oil, 64 percent, is sold to China, now the world’s second-largest consumer of oil. And while neither Khartoum, China, nor Petrodar release any statistics – this is generally believed to be an oil deal worth at least $2 billion a year.

China’s National Petroleum Corporation (CNPC) is the majority shareholder in both Petrodar and the Greater Nile Petroleum Operating Company, two of the biggest oil consortiums in Sudan.

CNPC has invested billions in oil-related infrastructure here in Paloich, including the 900-mile pipeline from the Paloich oil fields to the tanker terminal at Port Sudan on the Red Sea, a tarmac road leading to Khartoum, and a new airport with connecting flights to Beijing.

But they have not invested in much else here.

Locals live in meager huts, eating peanuts with perch fished out of the contaminated Nile. There is no electricity. A Swiss charity provides healthcare. An American aid group flies in food and mosquito nets. Most children do not go to school. There is no work to be found. Petrodar, for one, has its own workers – almost all of whom are foreigners (mostly Chinese, Malaysians, and Qataris) or Sudanese northerners. The consortium hires Paloich residents only rarely, for menial jobs.

h/t Desde el Exilio.

And remember the Sudanese genocide in Darfur? Well, err:

How China’s support of Sudan shields a regime called ‘genocidal’

Mercenaries are scooping up contracts here. Arms dealers are flying in and out on the daily flight from Nairobi, Kenya. And the rebels, theoretically out of work, are training full time on the dunes around Juba, South Sudan’s self-proclaimed capital.

Up north, in Sudan’s capital, Khartoum, weapons arsenals are filling up, talk is tough, and clear signals are being sent out that the resource-rich south will never be allowed to be independent.

(Map)

More than two years after the north-south peace agreement, and four years before the expected southern referendum on secession – it’s a matter of time, say observers, before the fragile calm blows up, reigniting the 21-year civil war that left 1.5 million dead.

It’s a lull in which both sides are regrouping for the new war,” says a Canadian UN military observer stationed in South Sudan, speaking on condition of anonymity.

Meanwhile, the Darfur crisis that has killed more than 200,000 and displaced more than 2.5 million in western Sudan continues to rage unabated, helping Sudan earn the top spot on Foreign Policy magazine’s “Failed State Index” for the second year in a row.

The Chinese are as much to blame for this situation as anyone, say critics, and not so much because of their economic policies but because of political ones.

Beijing has “a vested interest in the continuation of a low level of insecurity. It keeps the other major investors out,” charges the Brussels-based International Crisis Group (ICG) in a report. The report argues that China welcomes the absence of real peace in Sudan as enhancing its business opportunities, whatever the cost to southern Sudanese civilians: “There is [on the part of the Chinese] an almost total disregard for the human rights implications of their investments.”

This is unacceptable to leaders of the semiautonomous south who say they won’t sit idly by while revenue from Chinese drilling in their oil fields goes mostly to the Arab-dominated government in the north.

“This peace is ugly,” says Daniel Deng Moyndit, a former rebel who now chairs the Government of South Sudan’s parliamentary security committee. “They [Khartoum government officials] are not serious … and any state is entitled to defense in anticipation of aggression.”

Despite this, China doesn’t want another government in charge,” adds a Khartoum-based humanitarian aid worker, speaking on condition of anonymity. “They’re used to dealing with this government.”

While pockets of South Sudan are seeing some economic benefits from the shaky peace, the region in general is shortchanged. The main sore point has to do with years of underdevelopment and a perception that oil revenues are not being shared fairly.

Under the peace deal between north and south, oil profits are to be shared: 50 percent to the south, 48 percent to the north, and 2 to the specific oil-producing areas. But many in South Sudan say this agreement is not being implemented fairly.

Read both. They are very important.

And while this happens, our King and Queen do not suspend their visit to China to pay respects to the fallen because they are “strenghening ties with the Asian giant“.smile_baringteeth

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Q: As you know, the U.S. and European negotiators were unhappy with 070621_IranLarijani_vl.widecElBaradeis comments recently when he suggested that Irans uranium-enrichment program has advanced so far that the West may have to allow Tehran to keep some of that capacity. Do you see ElBaradei as being on Irans side in this matter now?

A: This is not only Mr. El Baradei who has made these assertions. There are intellectuals who are & more prone toward this approach, even inside the United States & We do believe we should have our rights through the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty [to develop civilian nuclear power]. And we believe that nobody should deviate toward a bomb & I ask you now, ever since the NPT came into effect [in 1970], have the countries in possession of nuclear weapons destroyed them? Dont we hear about new generations of nuclear weapons that the Americans and British are developing? The countries that have already developed nuclear weapons, have they ever accepted the NPT, like Pakistan, India and others? We would like to work within the framework of the NPT.

Exclusive: Iran’s Top Negotiator on Nukes, Iraq – Newsweek: World News – MSNBC.com

If I am not mistaken, the Non-proliferation Treaty is not about peaceful nuclear energy but about weapons. So, what is this about they “have their rights through the Nuclear non-Proliferation Treaty“? IF it’s only about energy, what is the need to mention that?

More commentary of this interview in NoisyRoom.Net.

From BBC h/t Jihad Watch:

Iranian naval forces in the Gulf tried to capture an Australian Navy boarding team but were vigorously repelled, the BBC has learned.

The incident took place before Iran successfully seized 15 British sailors and Marines in March.

The lessons from the earlier attempt do not appear to have been applied in time by British maritime patrols.

The 15 Britons were searching a cargo boat in the Gulf when they were captured over a boundary dispute.

From The Counterterrorism Blog:

The latest dramatic military and terror events in Gaza and Lebanon can be viewed from a regional geopolitical perspective: A Syro-Iranian axis offensive on its (their) primarily western front stretching along the Mediterranean coast.
..
In previous analyses I have argued that the Tehran-Damascus axis is involved in a regional campaign to seize as much physical terrain and score as many victories across the Middle East in order to consolidate their strategic posture before 2008; the year they believe Americans will limit – perhaps diminish — their moves because of the U.S. presidential campaign season.
.
Iran’s and Syria’s offensives have been well-coordinated on battlefields across the Levant since last January, with a clear escalation since early spring.

Remember the video where Larijani was holding the hand of a brunette? Well, he has been indicted by the lustful actkhatami2, even when he denies doing it and maintains that the tape has been altered:

“Khatami officially denied that he had shook hands with any woman and the film circulating is not based on reality,” said a statement from his office reported by the ISNA news agency and Ham Mihan newspaper.
“This film circulating on some conservative websites which shows him shaking hand with some Italian women is a version that has been edited and Khatami wholly denies this.”

Very important: Mike from Lamplighter, sent me yesterday a tip:

The U.S. House of Representatives passed a non-binding resolution urging the U.N. to charge Ahmadinejad, the Iranian President,under the UN Genocide Conventions. The resolution passed 411-2 – Dennie Kucinich (D-OH) and Ron Paul (R-TX) voted against the resolution. (Somehow I am not surprised that these two – representing the unstable elements of their respective parties – voted against this resolution).

Read it all.

If the other day, we had Jimmy Carter critisizing hardly US for its position -very justified- about not funding Hamas, Plateau writes about Carter’s influence in the seizing of power by Khomeini:

Carter viewed Khomeini as more of a religious holy man in a grassroots revolution than a founding father of modern terrorism. Carter’s ambassador to the UN, Andrew Young, said “Khomeini will eventually be hailed as a saint.” Carter’s Iranian ambassador, William Sullivan, said, “Khomeini is a Gandhi-like figure.” Carter adviser James Bill proclaimed in a Newsweek interview on February 12, 1979 that Khomeini was not a mad mujahid, but a man of “impeccable integrity and honesty.” smile_sniff

He also writes about the perils of historial revisionists, not only about recent times, but back to Cyrus the Great. Read it all also.

But there are also good news from Iran. Or, to be more precise, from Iranian blogosphere: they have succeeded in their campaign to stop a stoning. Go over to Kamagir to read the details. More comments on Cityboy Blog.

Lastly serendip comments about Increased Drug Flow Fueling Spread Of HIV In Iran and Economic Segregation:

The number of HIV cases in Iran is increasing rapidly because of the increased flow of heroin into the country from Afghanistan, and an increasing number of HIV cases are being transmitted sexually, Christian Salazar, UNICEF coordinator for HIV in Iran, said recently, Reuters/Javno.com reports. Iran is located along a “key heroin smuggling route” from Afghanistan to the West, and injection drug users are the highest-risk group in the country, according to Reuters/Javno.com. Iran has an adult HIV prevalence of about 0.16%, but the number of cases is “skyrocketing,” Salazar said, adding that in the “worst of cases we are moving toward 1% or even 1.8% to 1.9% of the population.” Two-thirds of HIV cases in the country occur among IDUs, Salazar said, adding that increasing numbers of narcotics are coming to the country from Afghanistan.

This is horrible marvellous: why on earth they do not stop the smuggling instead of hurrying to harrass women dressed in improper manner or torturing youths protesting peacefully in the streets?

UPDATE: Teheran open to nuclear compromise.

Key U.S. allies are debating the idea of a nuclear compromise with Iran that would call for only a partial freeze of Tehran’s uranium enrichment program — a stance that could put them at odds with Washington, officials said Friday.

The officials — U.S. and European diplomats and government employees — told The Associated Press that the deliberations among senior British, French and German decision-makers were only preliminary and that no conclusions had been drawn.

Germany was supportive, France opposed and Britain noncommittal, they said.

“Nothing is on paper,” said one European diplomat, describing the tentative plan as a “freeze for peace.”

With the United States continuing to insist on a full enrichment freeze, the talks could strain the U.S.-led attempt to show unity on the issue or even push Washington to settle for less than it has been demanding.

smile_whatchutalkingabout

UPDATE 2: Anyway, it seems that Iran is taking a step nearer to nuclear bomb. h/t Jonz.

Iran moved significantly closer towards acquiring the essential material for a nuclear bomb yesterday when the regime claimed to have stockpiled 100 kg of enriched uranium.

ahmadinerjacket

President Ahmadinejad ‘seems to be goading the West and Israel’

So far, this uranium has only been enriched to the level needed to run civilian nuclear power stations. But if Iran chooses to enrich it to 84 per cent purity, the uranium would reach weapons-grade level. Iran would need 50 kg of weapons-grade uranium in to make one atomic weapon of the kind that destroyed Hiroshima in 1945. By storing twice this quantity of low-enriched uranium, President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad’s regime is widening its options. smile_sad

Ahmadinerjacket 2

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